fbpx

Our Success

We, unashamedly, celebrate every success that our carers, young adults and/or children achieve. This might be the first length of a pool, their first bike ride or a gymnastics award – we really don’t mind what it is.

This page is our chance to boast and shout from the rafters about every success or milestone that is achieved.

A Day in the Life of a Fostering Agency

A Day in the Life of A fostering Agency

With the pandemic at large its given people the chance to think about their communities and to re-evaluate their lives. People are moving to the countryside, from the towns and working more from home. We have had an influx of ordinary people who have thought about fostering a child or sibling group.

There are 56,160 children living in foster families, (2019) with 44,450 foster families in England. You might ask if foster carers are needed. The answer is a resounding yes.

This week I have placed three sibling groups of children, and one single placement and another sibling group with our carers. There have been lots that I cannot place, as we don’t have the carers. Several teenagers that need a home, several young sibling groups of two or three and a parent along with her four children.

Had 45 referrals in one day of young people looking to be placed in a nice clean home, where they have their own bedroom, food in the cupboard and a routine set by the carers. All this serves to ensure that our young people feel safe. I like placing sibling groups as its great to keep young people together so that they share the same history.

I once had brand new carers, who had been approved that week. I was on leave but had a call from the placement team to ask how we might place 5 children together. Suffice to say, we ordered more beds!

Foster carers can only be approved for up to three placements, or they would be considered to be a children’s home if there are more than three. However, if there is one sibling group of one family, they count as one group and there can be however many children placed, that a carer has the room and support to be able to take.

So, this new set of carers who were approved for three placements, ended up with five children, with beds being delivered to them as the children were coming in the door. It was very exciting for the team to have five children placed together. We were able to keep them with the carers, who hired a car to take them all to school.

So if you want to keep siblings together and would like to foster siblings then we have a need for carers who have large homes who can take sibling groups. Subject to risk assessments, and age/gender, siblings are able to share rooms.

So even if you have one large bedroom you might be approved to take two siblings.

So if you want to do something really worthwhile and make that difference to your community, why not work from home and become a foster carer. What are you waiting for!

 

 

 

 

Read More

Competition Time – Name An Owl – Win £10!

Hello, everyone

I am unsure if you have met our Owls?

They are on our home page and they are very friendly, let me tell you about what’s happened….

We have five big owls, that live with our Bristol team, during lockdown they have been very busy, whilst we believed they were all tucked up, they were out being busy, we are now lucky to share with you our 5 baby owls.

These 5 baby owls are in need of names, can you please help? If you can please send your entries to jadams@fosteringfoundation.co.uk by Friday 25th September, we also need drawings of them, or any wildlife that you have seen whilst walking, this could be photos or drawings, whatever you would like.

The names for the owls, will be chosen by Will our Company Director, and the winners will receive a £10 voucher.

Owls are part of Fostering Foundation – they may offer guidance or be symbolic of great wisdom and intuition. These birds may warn of danger that can be overcome, or may foretell wealth or positive change. In some cultures, owls are even seen as messengers of the gods or liaisons to the spiritual world

We look forward to seeing your drawings, photos and hearing your thoughts on names.

Thank you for taking part.

Jo A

 

 

 

 

Read More

Foster Carer Profile – Plymouth Parent & Child, Sibling & Respite Fostering

First names, ages and location –
Debbie (57) & Chris (70). We live in Plymouth.

Current / previous jobs –
Chris is one of the directors of a local publishing company but also supports Debbie as the main foster carer.

How did you get into fostering?
We had for a number of years acted as a host family for foreign students and apprentice footballers from the local football league team. This gave us valuable experience in not only sharing our home, but also dealing with young people of many different nationalities and cultures.

Why did you do it at first?
After discussion with our four birth children we felt we had a large, happy home that we could share with other young people, offering them a safe place to live in a family setting.

How long have you been fostering?
12 years

Have you only worked with the Fostering Foundation, if no how have FF compared with other IFAs / the Local Authority?
We have only worked with FF, but are aware from other foster carers who are with LA or other agencies, that we get five star support.

Please tell us what working with FF has been like? 
We’ve have been incredibly well supported throughout our time with Fostering Foundation and genuinely feel that we are part of a big family and that we all pull together in the best interests of the children in our care.

What has been the most challenging things about fostering?
Not being able to make a difference as quickly as we would have liked. Dealing with teenage issues such as sexual exploitation, self harming and mental wellbeing.

What has been the most rewarding things about fostering?
Seeing young people overcome their often traumatic backgrounds to gain confidence and achieve their full potential.

What type of fostering placements have you provided?
Placements for Parent’s with their children, teenage boys and teenage girls, together with a number of emergency respite placements for other carers.

Please tell us about some of your experiences. 
We have looked after many children including siblings and individual children on both a long term and short term basis – until they were 18 and beyond. Also children who have successfully returned to live with their family all of which – have been very rewarding. We have worked alongside schools to support young people who have missed out on education, in one situation enabling a young person to go on to an apprenticeship. We have cared for a young person with very complex needs who needed to move on to more specialist facilities, but he remains very important to us and we remain in regular contact.

What would you say to anyone thinking of fostering?
It is at times challenging, but incredibly rewarding in terms of the impact that it has on the lives of young people. With the right support from an agency such as Fostering Foundation being a foster carer is being part of a real team effort.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

My Story – My Life as a Foster Carer

My wife and I were approved to become foster carers and to work within The Fostering Foundation in October 2008. There is no doubt that my life changed for the better! I had previously worked for 27 years in various offices in typical 9 – 5 jobs, it was time to try something different….

About a year later, we were introduced to 2 brothers aged 7 and 8 who were in need of a new start in Devon, an opportunity to break away from their previous life in another area of the country where they had lived with their birth family and then taken into foster care.

We agreed that the time was right for me to give up my office job and to become a full-time foster carer to the boys. I was 46 years old and on a steep learning curve as I do not have any birth children.
I quickly discovered that fostering presents many challenges; there are plenty of positive moments and always a few not so good, emotional highs and lows, comparable to riding a roller coaster perhaps! The life of a foster carer is also very rewarding, my wife and I have certainly enjoyed watching the boys grow and develop.

Our role as foster carers is to provide our children with a safe and loving home, a stable environment where they can prosper and to prepare them for adult life. It is also important to be good role models; many children in care have come from difficult places where they have not had the comforts of a happy family for help and support.

The last 10 years have certainly given me a new direction and a fresh start to my life. It is a real honour and a privilege for me to be a foster carer, I feel very fortunate to be where I am right now, I enjoy working with some amazing people and I am able to look forward to a bright future.

Thank you for reading my story.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

Being Left handed – a blessing or a curse?

The 13th August is International Left Handed Day and throughout history many left-handed children have been persecuted for it, been called “sinister” and other names and forced into changing their habits.

One of our Senior Social Workers, Martine, told us her story.

“I’m the only left handed one in my family so have got used to being called ‘cack-handed’ and have used it to my advantage. As a child it got me out of learning to knit as no one could teach me, meaning I could continue to read my Jackie magazine and eat Spangles. ( This may need some googling for those not my age).

I tend to get the cord on an iron all twisted, so that’s my excuse for limiting this fun chore.  I know there are cordless ones, but that might mean I’d have to start ironing hankies and the back of a shirt, which with Zoom no-one will see anyway.

I struggle to cut wrapping paper neatly even with my nifty left-handed scissors – but who doesn’t like to receive a present in a recycled gift bag?

In fact being left-handed has worked out well for me so far, with the exception of corned beef….I cannot open a tin of the lovely stuff with that fiddly key and that tips the balance, because I would happily knit one pearl one, iron to my hearts content and gift give with fancy ribbon and bows for a tin of corned beef”

 

Read More

My Story – My Life as a Foster Carer

My wife and I were approved to become foster carers and to work within The Fostering Foundation in October 2008. There is no doubt that my life changed for the better! I had previously worked for 27 years in various offices in typical 9 – 5 jobs, it was time to try something different….

About a year later, we were introduced to 2 brothers aged 7 and 8 who were in need of a new start in Devon, an opportunity to break away from their previous life in another area of the country where they had lived with their birth family and then taken into foster care.

We agreed that the time was right for me to give up my office job and to become a full-time foster carer to the boys. I was 46 years old and on a steep learning curve as I do not have any birth children.
I quickly discovered that fostering presents many challenges; there are plenty of positive moments and always a few not so good, emotional highs and lows, comparable to riding a roller coaster perhaps! The life of a foster carer is also very rewarding, my wife and I have certainly enjoyed watching the boys grow and develop.

Our role as foster carers is to provide our children with a safe and loving home, a stable environment where they can prosper and to prepare them for adult life. It is also important to be good role models; many children in care have come from difficult places where they have not had the comforts of a happy family for help and support.

The last 10 years have certainly given me a new direction and a fresh start to my life. It is a real honour and a privilege for me to be a foster carer, I feel very fortunate to be where I am right now, I enjoy working with some amazing people and I am able to look forward to a bright future.

Thank you for reading my story.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

National Play Day “Play helps children to learn…”

National Play Day August 2020

“Play is the highest expression of human development in childhood, for it alone is the free expression of what is in a child’s soul.” Friedrich Froebel

Play is a familiar term to us all but do we truly understand its value?
Play and its importance has been recognised from as early as early as 300 BC when the infamous Aristotle referred to the importance of play.
Whether it’s a game of peek-a-boo or this little piggy, riding a bike, jumping in puddles, playing a board game or being messy and creative, play provides us all with endless possibilities to grow and develop. The skills learnt from play experiences help to prepare us for the roles we undertake later in life and the relationships we enjoy through role-play and interaction with others. We don’t need toy’s and games to play, we can be resourceful, using whatever is available. It might be making a rainbow shaker from an empty plastic bottle, making a puppet from an old sock or glove or building sandcastles on the beach. One of the most important aspects of play, is the shared experience of fun and enjoyment which is amplified when in the presence of a mutually engaged adult or child.
Play helps children to learn, to develop language and communication, to explore the environment, to be creative and imaginative and also helps to develop our ability to concentrate and focus. Furthermore, play is fundamental in promoting good mental health as it allows us to express emotion and boosts a child’s ego, confidence and self-esteem.
Being ‘playful’ with our children, friends and family and ourselves, can be as beneficial as sitting down to a more formal play activity. When we are playful, we are more likely to make connections with others through shared laughter and enjoyment.

“With children, it is the joint moments of delight that build the social brain.” ~ Mariah Moser

Whilst play occurs across all cultural and societal daily interactions, Play also provides openings for healing past trauma’s, loss and grief and in helping to prepare children and their families for potentially difficult experiences. Since the mid twentieth century, the birth of specialist use of play as a fundamental basis for children’s therapy and emotional well-being in both Play Therapy and Hospital Play, to name but a few.

Our Therapeutic Practitioner Donna, is a Certified PTUK Play therapist. This is her room in our South West office. Through the use of play and creative arts, children have been supported to explore and ‘play out’ their inner emotional life and experiences in the first language they learnt, play. Play provides the child with the opportunity to explore and resolve their inner turmoil and to master new experiences through the therapeutic relationship with the play therapist.
Play provides children and adults with an array of benefits. It’s not just child play!

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

Triathlon athlete, come team manager has beaten the clock, to come in 10 months ahead of the finish line!!

We are celebrating Jim Willis, the team manager of our Bristol region, successfully completing the Level 5 Diploma in Leadership for Health and Social Care and Children and Young People’s Services. This qualification with a very long title, is the only current qualification in England recognised by Ofsted for a Registered Manager for a Fostering Agency.

Jim has completed the course which needs to be done within 18 months in just 8 whilst juggling full time work, three young children and training for a triathlon………. Go Jim!!

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

Supervising Social Worker – Job Vacancy Devon & Cornwall – Fostering Foundation

The Fostering Foundation are currently seeking to appoint a supervising social worker based in Devon & Cornwall on a permanent contract.

The Foundation is a small family feel independent fostering agency who prides its self on providing a happy, safe and supportive environment for foster carers, children and staff.

With teams based in Tavistock, Tiverton and Bristol areas the Foundation is seeking to recruit a motivated, driven and enthusiastic qualified social worker to join our teams to cover Plymouth, Tavistock and into Cornwall.

For a variety of reasons some children are unable to be raised by their families and need to be cared for either on a temporary or permanent basis with alternative carers.

Ensuring the children we care for are safe, healthy and happy is at the heart of the Foundations standards and values.

As a social worker you will be Social Work England registered and have a sound knowledge of the legislation that underpins the role such as the Fostering Minimum Standards, Care Planning Regulations and Working Together to Safe Guard Children. You will be committed to providing a high quality service to ensure our children and cares reach their full potential in whatever their ambitions.

• The role will also involve the recruitment and assessment of carers.
• Provide 24 hour support on a rota basis to all carers.
• Supervising and supporting foster cares to provide excellent levels of care to children in their care.
• The participation and attendance of foster carer support groups.
• Prepare and complete reports, reviews and recordings on a monthly and annual basis.
• Attend where required panel meetings, meetings and conferences.
• Participate in the foster care training and development.
• Working as part of team in the matching and placing of children with foster cares.
In return the Fostering Foundation provides
• A salary package up to £35,600 (which includes a car allowance) depending on experience.
• Generous Annual leave (starting at 25 days with increase on length of service)
• Company pension scheme
• Agile and flexible working including working from home.
• Low case load
• Regular supervision
• Development and training
• A Supportive, experienced and friendly team

This is an initial fixed term contract which could be permanent for the right candidate

For informal discussion please contact Georgina Dunk Registered Manager 07730 370317

Closing date 16th July 2020

 

 

 

 

Read More

“…welcome them into our loving family…if they haven’t been fortunate…”

Soban and Iqra were kind enough to give us these words about their experience with fostering.

“It’s been 19 months since my and husband and I were approved as a foster carer’s in Bristol. After
the assessment and panel we were really thrilled that now we will be able to help young people and
welcome them into our loving family, understanding that it may be difficult coming into our family
were we are full of love, listening, and caring for one another, if they haven’t been fortunate to experience a solid strong family network.
After our first placement we realised, it certainly isn’t easy, you will be working full time, there for them 24 hours a day, and need lots of flexibility as you will be doing things you’d never expect you would be doing, but a good learning curve for us all. It is such a nice feeling to provide for a young person, when they are se1ling and realise, they are cared for and we are there to support them. We are thoroughly enjoying our fostering experience.”

 

If you would like to ask about being a foster carer, just like Soban & Iqra, please call 03300 10 20 45 or email info@fosteringfoundation.co.uk

 

 

 

 

Read More

Find out more

Download all you need to know about becoming a carer simply fill in your details below for your free download.

  • How would you like Fostering Foundation to communicate?
  • How did you hear about us?

Let’s stay friends & keep up to date

Start typing and press Enter to search